Child Support

Minnesota child support laws changed significantly in 2007. Under the old law, a non-custodial parent paid a percentage of his or her net income for child support. Under the new Minnesota child support law, the obligation of both parents to pay support is calculated using a complex formula that takes into account the gross incomes of both parents, the percentage of time each parent has the children in his or her care, whether either parent pays support for other children, whether either parent pays alimony or spousal maintenance, and whether either parent has children from a different relationship also residing in the home.

Under the new Minnesota child support law, there are so many variables it is difficult to predict what a person's child support obligation might be without performing a calculation based upon all of the facts that are specific to that person's situation.

A parent who never has a child in his or her care is going to pay more child support than a parent who has a child in his or her care some of the time. And, a parent who has a child in his or her care at least forty-five percent of the time is going to pay significantly less than a parent who has a child in his care just every other weekend.